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pogo2posterFINAL2The Last Pogo Jumps Again studies the evolution of Toronto from small town to big city and it’s pop/counter-culture lifestyle during the early and mid-70s.  It centers around the first wave of Toronto punk rock and new-wave music, from the Ramones playing the New Yorker Theatre in ’76 through the police shutting down Teenage Head and causing a riot at the Horseshoe Tavern’s infamous “The Last Pogo” concert in December 1978.

London had the Sex Pistols, New York had the Ramones, but Toronto had a punk movement all it’s own.  The Toronto landscape by the late ’70s was forever changed with the infusion of the DIY/Punk/Alternative Culture(s) movement.  Six years in the making, The Last Pogo Jumps Again successfully explores the whys and wherefores of what was arguably one of the most exciting but misunderstood movements in Toronto’s history.

The DVD contains the 204 minute documentary, plus over a 100 minutes of added material, and a snazzy 24-page booklet.  Check the Shop for details on where you can purchase it.

The Last Pogo (1978) is the documentary that chronicled the last punk rock show at the Horseshoe Tavern when it was run by legendary Toronto promoters The Garys (Topp and Cormier) featuring The Scenics, Cardboard Brains, The Secrets, The Mods, The Ugly, The Viletones and Teenage Head. The Last Pogo was released on DVD in 2008 to great reviews.  Available at the Shop.

The New Yorker Theatre, Toronto, 1976/1977
The New Yorker in the ’30’s when it was known as The Astor. In 1976, with The Original 99 Cent Roxy still pulling in crowds in the east end, Gary Topp and partner Jeff Silverman opened The New Yorker Theatre, on the Yonge Street Strip, fifty yards south of where the indie underground cinema CineCity once stood. The pinball parlour Funland was across street, and on the next block south ...
Pretty Bad Boy
On-line memorabilia traders Molten Core gave us a bootleg of the first Ramones show in Toronto — the precise moment the time-line our project The Last Pogo Jumps Again:  A Biased & Incompleat History of Toronto Hamilton London Ontario Punk Rock Circa September 24 1976 to December 1 1978, Part One — starts. Randy Johnston had had the incredible foresight to interview people in the audience that night (September 24, 1976) ...
Prayin’ to Elvis on my knees…
Deal with the Devil;  copyright Kim Northrop.  Check out his art at kimnorthrop.com A year after interviewing the Topp half of The Garys, we’ve now chatted with the other half, sexy man-beast Cormier.   Gary had tons of interesting stuff to say on the partnership with Gary Topp and their years at the New Yorker and Horseshoe Tavern and The Edge and punk and rock and roll. Coming up this week is ...
Sit on my Facebook
So, does that song sound familiar?  Yup, the iconic Viletones tune “Possibilities” as performed by Nirvana (i.e. that 90’s band that sounded like any number of bands back in the late seventies.  But I guess we can’t diss Kurt too much if he had such good taste.)   The Diodes’ John Catto found this on his Internet machine, and turned us on to it via Facebook.    Peter Noble chimed ...
More songs about food and buildings.
Okay, maybe just a blog about buildings. One of the staff here at the bustling headquarters of the feature film The Last Pogo Jumps Again got a new pal on MySpace called Clash on the Danforth 1979, a group for people who went to the old Rex Theatre on Danforth Avenue in 1979 to see The Clash and Toronto’s own B-Girls.  Said staff member doesn’t recall much about the show, being ...
I’ll take today, you take tomorrow
Teenage Head/Last Pogo display at Dr. Disc’s in The Hammer It’s been a busy week since the passing of iconic Teenage Head frontman Frank “Frankie Venom” Kerr.  Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, and now the dust is settling.   No word yet on any official tributes, but once we know, you’ll know. Pogo H.Q. cut a cheque for Frankie’s children today (and we urge you to do the same;  details in the ...
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