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pogo2posterFINAL2The Last Pogo Jumps Again studies the evolution of Toronto from small town to big city and it’s pop/counter-culture lifestyle during the early and mid-70s.  It centers around the first wave of Toronto punk rock and new-wave music, from the Ramones playing the New Yorker Theatre in ’76 through the police shutting down Teenage Head and causing a riot at the Horseshoe Tavern’s infamous “The Last Pogo” concert in December 1978.

London had the Sex Pistols, New York had the Ramones, but Toronto had a punk movement all it’s own.  The Toronto landscape by the late ’70s was forever changed with the infusion of the DIY/Punk/Alternative Culture(s) movement.  Six years in the making, The Last Pogo Jumps Again successfully explores the whys and wherefores of what was arguably one of the most exciting but misunderstood movements in Toronto’s history.

The DVD contains the 204 minute documentary, plus over a 100 minutes of added material, and a snazzy 24-page booklet.  Check the Shop for details on where you can purchase it.

The Last Pogo (1978) is the documentary that chronicled the last punk rock show at the Horseshoe Tavern when it was run by legendary Toronto promoters The Garys (Topp and Cormier) featuring The Scenics, Cardboard Brains, The Secrets, The Mods, The Ugly, The Viletones and Teenage Head. The Last Pogo was released on DVD in 2008 to great reviews.  Available at the Shop.

The Last Pogo (1979; 25 minutes) and The Last Pogo Jumps Again (2013; 204 minutes)
THE LAST POGO (1979; 26 minutes) Produced and Directed by Colin Brunton and Patrick Lee; Edited by Patrick Lee Buy it on Vimeo for $9.95 CDN, or rent it for $3.73. From Dangerous Minds: “In 1978, Toronto (and some Hamilton) punks answered Scorsese’s The Last Waltz, a movie lousy with Canadians, by putting on their own star-studded farewell concert at the city’s Horseshoe Tavern.
Shit Bandit Talking Heads and The Dishes
“The art scene and the punk scene were completely intertwined,” says Erika Larner.  A regular at the Toronto’s infamous Crash ‘n’ Burn club in ’77, she now works on TV series and feature films in the wardrobe department. The Shit Bandit was a performance group who played at C.E.A.C., The Centre for Experimental Art and Communication in 1976. In the summer of 1977, CEAC lent their ...
What’s not in 1976
If you go see The Last Pogo Jumps Again, you’ll see a Toronto that is very different from the one you know today.  There was lots of stuff that just didn’t exist in 1976. Like gun violence.  It was rumoured that Ugly lead singer Mike Nightmare always packed a piece, and he was a bona-fide criminal, so that was a legit tool of the trade, I guess,  ...
That Was The Year That Was
In January we got some great photos of The Government (Flat Tire, Hemingway Hated Disco Music);  add Bobbe Besold as yet another of the terrific photographers there were in Toronto back in the mid-seventies.   Our total count so far is 612 photos spread over our four hour movie. We discovered http://chuckmanothercollection.blogspot.com/ and John Chuckman’s awesome collection of postcards.  Unfortunately, not enough dpi to show on the big ...
Tony dishes out the goods
Fun thing to do west of Avenue Road in Toronto courtesy of clickdaterepeat.com Co-directors Brunton & Paputts took the Pogomobile down to the dreaded west end of Toronto, the land of beards and bicycles, cafes and culture crowding every corner (really, how many coffee shops do you need?) to visit Dishes and Drastic Measures co-founder Tony Malone in his century home in the annex. Hours of thought and ...
Shadowy Men
A  young Don Pyle photographed by Carm Ferrari Ex Crash Kills Five and Shadowy Men on a Shadowy Planet  Don Pyle kindly sent us some photos of Tyrrana and himself as a younger man, including the one above, by Carm Ferrari.  Don wrote Pogo H.Q. a note to remind them that prior to the Ramones second show at the New Yorker, in the spring of ’77, he asked theatre ...
More Buildings about Food and Songs, Part One
The B-movie Caged Heat was shown often at Gary Topp’s The Original 99 Cent Roxy Theatre in Toronto in the mid-seventies.  Written and directed by Jonathon Demme, with an original score by John Cale.   Demme would go on to direct (among many films), The Talking Heads‘ concert film Stop Making Sense. John Cale would play the New Yorker (Gary Topp‘s new venue) theatre in February of 1977, fanning the flames that ...
Sit on my Facebook
So, does that song sound familiar?  Yup, the iconic Viletones tune “Possibilities” as performed by Nirvana (i.e. that 90’s band that sounded like any number of bands back in the late seventies.  But I guess we can’t diss Kurt too much if he had such good taste.)   The Diodes’ John Catto found this on his Internet machine, and turned us on to it via Facebook.    Peter Noble chimed ...
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