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pogo2posterFINAL2The Last Pogo Jumps Again studies the evolution of Toronto from small town to big city and it’s pop/counter-culture lifestyle during the early and mid-70s.  It centers around the first wave of Toronto punk rock and new-wave music, from the Ramones playing the New Yorker Theatre in ’76 through the police shutting down Teenage Head and causing a riot at the Horseshoe Tavern’s infamous “The Last Pogo” concert in December 1978.

London had the Sex Pistols, New York had the Ramones, but Toronto had a punk movement all it’s own.  The Toronto landscape by the late ’70s was forever changed with the infusion of the DIY/Punk/Alternative Culture(s) movement.  Six years in the making, The Last Pogo Jumps Again successfully explores the whys and wherefores of what was arguably one of the most exciting but misunderstood movements in Toronto’s history.

The DVD contains the 204 minute documentary, plus over a 100 minutes of added material, and a snazzy 24-page booklet.  Check the Shop for details on where you can purchase it.

The Last Pogo (1978) is the documentary that chronicled the last punk rock show at the Horseshoe Tavern when it was run by legendary Toronto promoters The Garys (Topp and Cormier) featuring The Scenics, Cardboard Brains, The Secrets, The Mods, The Ugly, The Viletones and Teenage Head. The Last Pogo was released on DVD in 2008 to great reviews.  Available at the Shop.

Peter Vronsky’s Crash ‘n’ Burn movie
Screen shot John Catto of The Diodes The Last Pogo Jumps Again has a ton of 16mm film footage from 1977 and 1978.  One of the biggest contributors was filmmaker, author and university professor Peter Vronsky who let us use footage from his Crash ‘n’ Burn movie.  We asked Peter how it came about and what happened to the missing footage. Photo David Andoff “In 1977 I was living ...
Shit Bandit Talking Heads and The Dishes
“The art scene and the punk scene were completely intertwined,” says Erika Larner.  A regular at the Toronto’s infamous Crash ‘n’ Burn club in ’77, she now works on TV series and feature films in the wardrobe department. The Shit Bandit was a performance group who played at C.E.A.C., The Centre for Experimental Art and Communication in 1976. In the summer of 1977, CEAC lent their ...
Ross Taylor pics
All of the following photos were done by Ross Taylor, and all taken between 1976 and 1980, and they’re all copyright.  First one above is The Dead Boys’ Cheetah Chrome with the Viletones’ Steven Leckie.  Cheetah is the only non-local featured in our feature doc The Last Pogo Jumps Again, because The Dead Boys played in Toronto a lot and Cheetah is awesome.
Good Girls like Bad Boys
Here’s a page from an issue of the old Pig Paper, featuring an ad for the original The Last Pogo, as well as the news that B-Girl Cynthia Ross married Dead Boys Stiv Bators.  Courtesy of our friend Gary Pig Gold.  Find more back issues right around here. As regards the ad?  There were three changes from the original ad up to show time.  Nash the ...
The Tremblays: Battling Nazis and bad music since 1941.
Montreal artist & guitarist Rick Trembles created the font, comics, poster and T-shirts (on sale here!) for our movie The Last Pogo Jumps Again, and his father Jack Tremblay co-created Rick. Jack Tremblay was born in 1926 in Rhode Island.  The family moved to Thunder Bay (or Tunder Bay for those with a French-Canadian accent), and then finally settled in Montreal when Jack was eight.  ...
What’s not in 1976
If you go see The Last Pogo Jumps Again, you’ll see a Toronto that is very different from the one you know today.  There was lots of stuff that just didn’t exist in 1976. Like gun violence.  It was rumoured that Ugly lead singer Mike Nightmare always packed a piece, and he was a bona-fide criminal, so that was a legit tool of the trade, I guess,  ...
“Its all killer, no filler.”
Poster by artist Rick Trembles Even with our very limited exposure to date (two cast ‘n’ crew screenings;  World Premiere at Canadian Music Week), we’ve done well with reviewers. In Mechanical Forest Sound, blogger Joe said:  “A true labour of love, this film is a worthy testament to a brief spurt of under-documented and under-appreciated history.”  Sarah Gopaul, posting in Digital Journel:  ” More than just ...
“The farther away I get from Hamilton, the less interesting the world becomes.”
Late notice, but there’s going to be a free “cast ‘n’ crew” screening at the venerable This Ain’t Hollywood tavern in The Hammer on Tuesday night, named after the same song by locals The Forgotten Rebels.  If you were in the film, or helped us wrangle music or posters or photos or handbills, or were friends with someone who did, then consider yourself invited.  Like, we’re not checking ...
Overture, curtains, lights.
We were the opening band for our World Premiere on the last day of Canadian Music Week Film Festival last week.  Saturday Afternoon at the Movies, and we sold out, man. Hat tip to thriftyvinyl.wordpress.com The people at the TIFF Bell Lightbox were great (thanks kids with walkie-talkies!  thanks Jeff Wright!);  filmmakers Colin Brunton and Kire Paputts got there early to set the volume for the pre-show music, ...
Under construction!
So, we had a pretty raucous cast and crew screening at the lovely run-down Projection Booth Theatre in Toronto in December, and now its time to apply to festivals and maybe a little tour of sorts. It was only for “cast and crew” and there were a couple of hundred people and a couple of hundred beers there.  If you’ve never, y’know, spent over six years making a documentary ...
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