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pogo2posterFINAL2The Last Pogo Jumps Again studies the evolution of Toronto from small town to big city and it’s pop/counter-culture lifestyle during the early and mid-70s.  It centers around the first wave of Toronto punk rock and new-wave music, from the Ramones playing the New Yorker Theatre in ’76 through the police shutting down Teenage Head and causing a riot at the Horseshoe Tavern’s infamous “The Last Pogo” concert in December 1978.

London had the Sex Pistols, New York had the Ramones, but Toronto had a punk movement all it’s own.  The Toronto landscape by the late ’70s was forever changed with the infusion of the DIY/Punk/Alternative Culture(s) movement.  Six years in the making, The Last Pogo Jumps Again successfully explores the whys and wherefores of what was arguably one of the most exciting but misunderstood movements in Toronto’s history.

The DVD contains the 204 minute documentary, plus over a 100 minutes of added material, and a snazzy 24-page booklet.  Check the Shop for details on where you can purchase it.

The Last Pogo (1978) is the documentary that chronicled the last punk rock show at the Horseshoe Tavern when it was run by legendary Toronto promoters The Garys (Topp and Cormier) featuring The Scenics, Cardboard Brains, The Secrets, The Mods, The Ugly, The Viletones and Teenage Head. The Last Pogo was released on DVD in 2008 to great reviews.  Available at the Shop.

Record Store Day and free DVDs
Saturday April 18 is International Record Store day, and to join in on the fun, we’re going to be giving away free copies of the 1978 short film The Last Pogo.  The first ten customers who buy The Last Pogo Jumps Again DVD at Toronto’s Soundscapes, Rotate This, Sonic Boom or Tiny Record Shop on Record Store Day get a ...
Viliam Hrubovak/Jolie Fejer photos, and thanks for dropping by.
After eight shows in one week at the Big Picture Cinema in Toronto’s east end, our first run has come to a close.  We got a ton of great press, but more gratifying was the reaction we got at the theatre:  applause every night;  no walk-outs;  and people pleasantly surprised that a 3 hr 20 minute movie could move so fast.  As Less Lee Moore of Popshifter said: 
Music to get beaten up by
Cover of the book by Maria Raha “Cinderella punks” is the phrase The Existers’ George Higton used to describe  the recent resurgence of first-wave punks.   We can only report what’s been going on in Toronto the past couple of years — new material by The Scenics and The Existers;  rereleases by Simply Saucer and The Mods;  old material redux by Teenage Head;  live recordings from 1977 by The Viletones ...
I Believe in Miracles
Back in 1988, when The Last Pogo Jumps Again co-director Colin Brunton was producing his first feature, Roadkill (featuring a cameo by Joey Ramone), he and partner-in-crime Bruce McDonald schemed up many marketing and promotion ideas, adhering to Sex Pistols‘ manager Malcolm McLaren’s number one rule: Establish the Name. Before they rolled on the first day of production, all the local critics and everyone in the indie film ...
I Belong to the Beat Generation
The beatnik on the right sports a safety pin. In 1959, beat poet Rod McKuen, he of mushy and syrupy poems and songs recorded “I Belong to the Beat Generation” under the pseudonym Bob McFadden And Dor. Less than twenty years later, Richard Hell would rewrite it as the punk anthem “I Belong to the Blank Generation” — and not share any writing credits, btw. Apart from bearing a striking resemblance to Mr.
Facebook Sex Pistol Paul Cook digs our blog
Courtesy the punkpaper.free.fr Lucasta Ross plays with Steven Leckie & The Solutions! at the Last Pogo 30th bash December 2008; photo by Edie Steiner Lucasta and the rest of the B-Girls in 1977;  photo by Rodney Bowes The Last Pogo Jumps Again co-director Kire Paputts is busying himself prepping his short film, but still has time to track down and interview more of the folks we need for our sprawling documentary.  Last week ...
Extra extra, read all about it!
September 24 1976.   The Toronto Star’s Peter Goddard looks forward to the “undistinguished band from the Queen’s area in New York…” September 26, 1976.  Peter Goddard likes the Ramones. Someone takes out an ad in the Toronto Star, November 1 1976. The Sex Pistols swear on TV, December 10, 1976. Steven Leckie takes out an ad in the Toronto Star classifieds, December 11 1976. Patti Smith plays Toronto;  local media are not impressed.  December ...
Too Much Junkie Business
This Friday at Sneaky Dee’s in Toronto;  The Hammer on Saturday. When Johnny Thunders and Jerry Nolan quit the New York Dolls in 1975, they started The Heartbreakers, inviting Richard Hell and Walter Lure to join in on the fun.  Richard didn’t stick around too long — he started his own band Richard Hell & The Voidoids — Billy Wrath joins up, and they all have a blast in England in ...
Here a pogo, there a pogo, everywhere a Last Pogo
The continued shooting and editing of The Last Pogo Jumps Again has been put on hold for a couple of weeks while we get ready for the DVD release of the original film, The Last Pogo.   We’ve never visited the post-office so much as we have in the last week, shipping orders to stores in San Diego, Glendale, and Chicago;  dropping samples off at local Toronto stores;  and grabbing the ...
Anarchy in the pre-K
Actor Manoj Sood from from Little Mosque on the Prairie. Indian Head, Saskatchewan, where an air-raid siren goes off each noon, where Satchel Paige pitched in the ’40’s, and where the Ku Klux Klan once built a retirement home, Last Pogo director Brunton witnessed the bitter-sweet end of eighty days of shooting on season three of the tv series Little Mosque on the Prairie.   Before he leaves he’ll visit Vintage Vinyl ...