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pogo2posterFINAL2The Last Pogo Jumps Again studies the evolution of Toronto from small town to big city and it’s pop/counter-culture lifestyle during the early and mid-70s.  It centers around the first wave of Toronto punk rock and new-wave music, from the Ramones playing the New Yorker Theatre in ’76 through the police shutting down Teenage Head and causing a riot at the Horseshoe Tavern’s infamous “The Last Pogo” concert in December 1978.

London had the Sex Pistols, New York had the Ramones, but Toronto had a punk movement all it’s own.  The Toronto landscape by the late ’70s was forever changed with the infusion of the DIY/Punk/Alternative Culture(s) movement.  Six years in the making, The Last Pogo Jumps Again successfully explores the whys and wherefores of what was arguably one of the most exciting but misunderstood movements in Toronto’s history.

The DVD contains the 204 minute documentary, plus over a 100 minutes of added material, and a snazzy 24-page booklet.  Check the Shop for details on where you can purchase it.

The Last Pogo (1978) is the documentary that chronicled the last punk rock show at the Horseshoe Tavern when it was run by legendary Toronto promoters The Garys (Topp and Cormier) featuring The Scenics, Cardboard Brains, The Secrets, The Mods, The Ugly, The Viletones and Teenage Head. The Last Pogo was released on DVD in 2008 to great reviews.  Available at the Shop.

The Horseshoe Tavern 1978
The Horseshoe 1978. In May, 1978, after they left the New Yorker Theatre, partners Topp, Cormier and Silverman took over management of the Horseshoe Tavern, a dive bar that featured country and western music that was at the down-on-its-luck corner of Spadina and Queen. Opened in the 1940’s by Jack Starr, the Horseshoe had a massive main room that could hold five hundred people, and was a favourite hangout ...
Sez who?
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Hemingway Hated Disco Music
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I Belong to the Beat Generation
The beatnik on the right sports a safety pin. In 1959, beat poet Rod McKuen, he of mushy and syrupy poems and songs recorded “I Belong to the Beat Generation” under the pseudonym Bob McFadden And Dor. Less than twenty years later, Richard Hell would rewrite it as the punk anthem “I Belong to the Blank Generation” — and not share any writing credits, btw. Apart from bearing a striking resemblance to Mr.
Too Much Junkie Business
This Friday at Sneaky Dee’s in Toronto;  The Hammer on Saturday. When Johnny Thunders and Jerry Nolan quit the New York Dolls in 1975, they started The Heartbreakers, inviting Richard Hell and Walter Lure to join in on the fun.  Richard didn’t stick around too long — he started his own band Richard Hell & The Voidoids — Billy Wrath joins up, and they all have a blast in England in ...
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