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pogo2posterFINAL2The Last Pogo Jumps Again studies the evolution of Toronto from small town to big city and it’s pop/counter-culture lifestyle during the early and mid-70s.  It centers around the first wave of Toronto punk rock and new-wave music, from the Ramones playing the New Yorker Theatre in ’76 through the police shutting down Teenage Head and causing a riot at the Horseshoe Tavern’s infamous “The Last Pogo” concert in December 1978.

London had the Sex Pistols, New York had the Ramones, but Toronto had a punk movement all it’s own.  The Toronto landscape by the late ’70s was forever changed with the infusion of the DIY/Punk/Alternative Culture(s) movement.  Six years in the making, The Last Pogo Jumps Again successfully explores the whys and wherefores of what was arguably one of the most exciting but misunderstood movements in Toronto’s history.

The DVD contains the 204 minute documentary, plus over a 100 minutes of added material, and a snazzy 24-page booklet.  Check the Shop for details on where you can purchase it.

The Last Pogo (1978) is the documentary that chronicled the last punk rock show at the Horseshoe Tavern when it was run by legendary Toronto promoters The Garys (Topp and Cormier) featuring The Scenics, Cardboard Brains, The Secrets, The Mods, The Ugly, The Viletones and Teenage Head. The Last Pogo was released on DVD in 2008 to great reviews.  Available at the Shop.

The New Yorker Theatre, Toronto, 1976/1977
The New Yorker in the ’30’s when it was known as The Astor. In 1976, with The Original 99 Cent Roxy still pulling in crowds in the east end, Gary Topp and partner Jeff Silverman opened The New Yorker Theatre, on the Yonge Street Strip, fifty yards south of where the indie underground cinema CineCity once stood. The pinball parlour Funland was across street, and on the next block south ...
Record Store Day and free DVDs
Saturday April 18 is International Record Store day, and to join in on the fun, we’re going to be giving away free copies of the 1978 short film The Last Pogo.  The first ten customers who buy The Last Pogo Jumps Again DVD at Toronto’s Soundscapes, Rotate This, Sonic Boom or Tiny Record Shop on Record Store Day get a ...
Turned out a Punk
A couple of weeks ago, The Last Pogo Jumps Again co-director/producer Colin Brunton ventured out to the west end of Toronto to sit down with Fucked Up’s lead singer Damian Abraham and be interviewed for Damian’s podcast Turned out a Punk. Nash the Slash playing with Breathless, circa 1973 Among other things, they talked about: Nash the Slash the punk before punk in Toronto;  bringing your teacher to ...
Nice words from Jersey Beat
Check out more of Jersey Beat.
You’re going to need a bigger box of popcorn.
Toronto 1976 – 1978:  Queen St West was a ghost-town; you weren’t allowed to put handbills up on telephone poles, and you could get arrested for wearing studded collars and yelled at if your hair was dyed purple. After starting this project in 2006, our Digital Versatile Disc (DVD) of our monster 204 minute documentary,  The Last Pogo Jumps Again, is out. Its the original 204 minute documentary, ...
Peter Vronsky’s Crash ‘n’ Burn movie
Screen shot John Catto of The Diodes The Last Pogo Jumps Again has a ton of 16mm film footage from 1977 and 1978.  One of the biggest contributors was filmmaker, author and university professor Peter Vronsky who let us use footage from his Crash ‘n’ Burn movie.  We asked Peter how it came about and what happened to the missing footage. Photo David Andoff “In 1977 I was living ...
Gail Bryck photos
When Gail Bryck took photos, she’d use a long exposure.  This is a shot of The Viletones’ Steven Leckie showing off his scars — and an unfortunate glimpse of a swastika patch on guitarist Freddy Pompeii. Zero4’s Zero with innkeeper of the 404 speak-easy, Gambi Bowker.  It’s as shocking now — if not more so than it was — to see how blithely people sported swastikas.  This ...
Toronto punk handbills 1976 – 1978
There are over 600 photographs in The Last Pogo Jumps Again, and a ton more handbills. This is the handbill for a 1977 show at the New Yorker.  You can tell that it was done with Letraset, because the lines aren’t perfect, but it was hard to figure out how they actually superimposed the photo of the cops onto the photo of the Ramones.  No Photoshop back then, ...
From Dangerous Minds dot net.
That Was The Year That Was
In January we got some great photos of The Government (Flat Tire, Hemingway Hated Disco Music);  add Bobbe Besold as yet another of the terrific photographers there were in Toronto back in the mid-seventies.   Our total count so far is 612 photos spread over our four hour movie. We discovered http://chuckmanothercollection.blogspot.com/ and John Chuckman’s awesome collection of postcards.  Unfortunately, not enough dpi to show on the big ...
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