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pogo2posterFINAL2The Last Pogo Jumps Again studies the evolution of Toronto from small town to big city and it’s pop/counter-culture lifestyle during the early and mid-70s.  It centers around the first wave of Toronto punk rock and new-wave music, from the Ramones playing the New Yorker Theatre in ’76 through the police shutting down Teenage Head and causing a riot at the Horseshoe Tavern’s infamous “The Last Pogo” concert in December 1978.

London had the Sex Pistols, New York had the Ramones, but Toronto had a punk movement all it’s own.  The Toronto landscape by the late ’70s was forever changed with the infusion of the DIY/Punk/Alternative Culture(s) movement.  Six years in the making, The Last Pogo Jumps Again successfully explores the whys and wherefores of what was arguably one of the most exciting but misunderstood movements in Toronto’s history.

The DVD contains the 204 minute documentary, plus over a 100 minutes of added material, and a snazzy 24-page booklet.  Check the Shop for details on where you can purchase it.

The Last Pogo (1978) is the documentary that chronicled the last punk rock show at the Horseshoe Tavern when it was run by legendary Toronto promoters The Garys (Topp and Cormier) featuring The Scenics, Cardboard Brains, The Secrets, The Mods, The Ugly, The Viletones and Teenage Head. The Last Pogo was released on DVD in 2008 to great reviews.  Available at the Shop.

The Horseshoe Tavern 1978
The Horseshoe 1978. In May, 1978, after they left the New Yorker Theatre, partners Topp, Cormier and Silverman took over management of the Horseshoe Tavern, a dive bar that featured country and western music that was at the down-on-its-luck corner of Spadina and Queen. Opened in the 1940’s by Jack Starr, the Horseshoe had a massive main room that could hold five hundred people, and was a favourite hangout ...
35 years ago today
December 1, 1978 was the night of The Last Pogo concert at the Horseshoe Tavern in Toronto.  It was completed as a short film a year later, and then 35 years after that, filmmakers Colin Brunton and Kire Paputts finally completed, after six years of shooting and editing, The Last Pogo Jumps Again, a three hour and twenty minute feature document(ary) that acts as a sort of prequel.
Toronto 1977: Gays and Punks
The punk scene started up in Toronto in late 1976 and there weren’t many places to play.  When The Viletones began burning bridges in ’77, with owners scared to let them into their clubs, manager Tibor Takacs had to search for someplace new.  He ended up at Club David’s, a gay nightclub at the intersection of two laneways near Yonge and Bloor.  (Read about David’s history here ...
Bollocks
That’s Alex “Runt” Currie in the middle with the safety pin thru his head. Bollocks was a short film made by Pogo filmmaker Colin Brunton and Elizabeth Aikenhead while they were taking a weekend filmmaking course at the old Toronto Filmmakers’ Co-op.  Their teacher was Patrick Lee, who would, a year later, help Colin pull it together to make The Last Pogo.  We took the original footage to a ...
Props from The Grid
Toronto’s weekly rag The Grid has proclaimed, on their front page, that Toronto is “the best music city on the planet.”  You have to take that with a big grain of salt, considering that it’s a local newsweekly that’s said it, and of course as Torontonians, our natural insecurity lays waste to grandiose statements like that, yet there might be some truth to it.  Whatever the case, it ...
That Ancient Teenage Dream
Marcel Duchamp’s “Fountain.” The Dadaists in the 1920’s turned the artworld on its head by doing stuff like turning urinals on their end and calling it Art. The Velvet Underground 1966; John Cale in the foreground. “And there would go the secret plot, the piss had missed the hole in the pot, like that ancient teenage dream, from soul to poisoned soul to poisoned soul,” so sang John Cale post ...
The Last Pogo: Just like The Last Waltz, but with different bands
Chris Haight at the screening of The Last Pogo at NXNE, June 2008. We’re making plans to get The Last Pogo out on DVD by December 1 this year, the 30th anniversary. Since the original Pogo is but a scant (yet action-packed and aurally exciting) half-hour, we’re going to beef up the DVD to a full two hours with “extras” and a couple of “easter eggs”.
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