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pogo2posterFINAL2The Last Pogo Jumps Again studies the evolution of Toronto from small town to big city and it’s pop/counter-culture lifestyle during the early and mid-70s.  It centers around the first wave of Toronto punk rock and new-wave music, from the Ramones playing the New Yorker Theatre in ’76 through the police shutting down Teenage Head and causing a riot at the Horseshoe Tavern’s infamous “The Last Pogo” concert in December 1978.

London had the Sex Pistols, New York had the Ramones, but Toronto had a punk movement all it’s own.  The Toronto landscape by the late ’70s was forever changed with the infusion of the DIY/Punk/Alternative Culture(s) movement.  Six years in the making, The Last Pogo Jumps Again successfully explores the whys and wherefores of what was arguably one of the most exciting but misunderstood movements in Toronto’s history.

The DVD contains the 204 minute documentary, plus over a 100 minutes of added material, and a snazzy 24-page booklet.  Check the Shop for details on where you can purchase it.

The Last Pogo (1978) is the documentary that chronicled the last punk rock show at the Horseshoe Tavern when it was run by legendary Toronto promoters The Garys (Topp and Cormier) featuring The Scenics, Cardboard Brains, The Secrets, The Mods, The Ugly, The Viletones and Teenage Head. The Last Pogo was released on DVD in 2008 to great reviews.  Available at the Shop.

Toronto 1977: Gays and Punks
The punk scene started up in Toronto in late 1976 and there weren’t many places to play.  When The Viletones began burning bridges in ’77, with owners scared to let them into their clubs, manager Tibor Takacs had to search for someplace new.  He ended up at Club David’s, a gay nightclub at the intersection of two laneways near Yonge and Bloor.  (Read about David’s history here ...
Looooooooooooooooooooooou!
A small wet crowd at This Ain’t Hollywood last night in Hamilton for the cast ‘n’ crew screening — but they were enthusiastic, and were there to watch the movie, and not just drink beer.  A handful of people from Toronto made the drive out to The Hammer to see the film for the second or third time (that’s batting .667 or .1000, baseball friends!), and some nice ...
“The farther away I get from Hamilton, the less interesting the world becomes.”
Late notice, but there’s going to be a free “cast ‘n’ crew” screening at the venerable This Ain’t Hollywood tavern in The Hammer on Tuesday night, named after the same song by locals The Forgotten Rebels.  If you were in the film, or helped us wrangle music or posters or photos or handbills, or were friends with someone who did, then consider yourself invited.  Like, we’re not checking ...
Overture, curtains, lights.
We were the opening band for our World Premiere on the last day of Canadian Music Week Film Festival last week.  Saturday Afternoon at the Movies, and we sold out, man. Hat tip to thriftyvinyl.wordpress.com The people at the TIFF Bell Lightbox were great (thanks kids with walkie-talkies!  thanks Jeff Wright!);  filmmakers Colin Brunton and Kire Paputts got there early to set the volume for the pre-show music, ...
Picture My Face
The late, great Frank “Frankie Venom” Kerr of Hamilton’s Teenage Head.  Photo credit unknown. Steven Leckie of The Viletones swings a chain.  Copyright Ross Taylor 2012 Mike Nightmare of The Ugly gets doused with a stubby.  Copyright Dan Huziak 2012 Steven Leckie draped over Freddy Pompeii, both of The Viletones.  Copyright Gail Bryck 2012. Mickey De Sadist and The Forgotten Rebels.
That Was The Year That Was
In January we got some great photos of The Government (Flat Tire, Hemingway Hated Disco Music);  add Bobbe Besold as yet another of the terrific photographers there were in Toronto back in the mid-seventies.   Our total count so far is 612 photos spread over our four hour movie. We discovered http://chuckmanothercollection.blogspot.com/ and John Chuckman’s awesome collection of postcards.  Unfortunately, not enough dpi to show on the big ...
Imants Krumins
There’s not much we can add to the stuff that Gary Pig Gold wrote in the above article, except that Imants was a great help to our project, tirelessly answering emails and digging up obscure handbills about obscure bands.  He sadly passed away this summer.  We managed to interview him as well, back in the early (read 2007) days of our project, but frankly, he was a little ...
The Agoraphobic Cowboy
Cover of the 2006 Grammy nominated album by Rick Moranis. As we wind down the project, our focus is mostly on clearing rights for the 600+ photos, 50+ songs, and miles of archival footage we’re using for our epic punk rock doc The Last Pogo Jumps Again:  A Biased & Incomplete History Of Toronto, Hamilton and London, Ontario Punk Rock And New Wave Music Circa September 24 ...
Six Degrees of Tim Horton
We’re all only a few degrees away from Tim Horton One of the last images in the epic five hour punkumentary-in-progress, The Last Pogo Jumps Again is of The Forgotten Rebels’ Chris Houston and Mickey DeSadist revisiting a favourite Tim Horton’s donut shop they used to frequent in the late seventies in The Hammer. Many people who would end up being part of the Toronto punk rock scene ...
Role Call
After almost four years of shooting for The Last Pogo Jumps Again, here’s a list of all the local bands from the specific era September 24 1976 to December 1 1978 that we’ve represented in the film:    The Androids,  Arson, The Battered Wives, The B-Girls, The Cads, Cardboard Brains, Crash Kills Five, The Curse, The Dents, The Demics, The Diodes, Drastic Measures, The Existers, The Fits, Forgotten Rebels, The Government, ...
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