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pogo2posterFINAL2The Last Pogo Jumps Again studies the evolution of Toronto from small town to big city and it’s pop/counter-culture lifestyle during the early and mid-70s.  It centers around the first wave of Toronto punk rock and new-wave music, from the Ramones playing the New Yorker Theatre in ’76 through the police shutting down Teenage Head and causing a riot at the Horseshoe Tavern’s infamous “The Last Pogo” concert in December 1978.

London had the Sex Pistols, New York had the Ramones, but Toronto had a punk movement all it’s own.  The Toronto landscape by the late ’70s was forever changed with the infusion of the DIY/Punk/Alternative Culture(s) movement.  Six years in the making, The Last Pogo Jumps Again successfully explores the whys and wherefores of what was arguably one of the most exciting but misunderstood movements in Toronto’s history.

The DVD contains the 204 minute documentary, plus over a 100 minutes of added material, and a snazzy 24-page booklet.  Check the Shop for details on where you can purchase it.

The Last Pogo (1978) is the documentary that chronicled the last punk rock show at the Horseshoe Tavern when it was run by legendary Toronto promoters The Garys (Topp and Cormier) featuring The Scenics, Cardboard Brains, The Secrets, The Mods, The Ugly, The Viletones and Teenage Head. The Last Pogo was released on DVD in 2008 to great reviews.  Available at the Shop.

The New Yorker Theatre, Toronto, 1976/1977
The New Yorker in the ’30’s when it was known as The Astor. In 1976, with The Original 99 Cent Roxy still pulling in crowds in the east end, Gary Topp and partner Jeff Silverman opened The New Yorker Theatre, on the Yonge Street Strip, fifty yards south of where the indie underground cinema CineCity once stood. The pinball parlour Funland was across street, and on the next block south ...
Peter Vronsky’s Crash ‘n’ Burn movie
Screen shot John Catto of The Diodes The Last Pogo Jumps Again has a ton of 16mm film footage from 1977 and 1978.  One of the biggest contributors was filmmaker, author and university professor Peter Vronsky who let us use footage from his Crash ‘n’ Burn movie.  We asked Peter how it came about and what happened to the missing footage. Photo David Andoff “In 1977 I was living ...
Fast, Cheap & Good
Raggedy handbill, 1976;  courtesy of Robert Malyon. Smoking a joint in the back row of his movie theatre The New Yorker, watching the out-of-synch Blank Generation, promoter Gary Topp twigged on the idea of bringing some of the bands from Amos Poe’s movie into town.  It was 1976.  When he tried to track down The Ramones, few people in the business knew who they were. Photo by David Andoff. A concrete stage was ...
Cut ‘n’ Paste
Poster created by John Pearson, 1974. Back in the period we’re covering in The Last Pogo Jumps Again:  A Biased & Incomplete History Of Toronto Punk Rock Circa September 24 1976 To December 1 1978 was the start of homemade handbills in Toronto.   After The Ramones hit the stage of The New Yorker (September 24, 1976) posters of quickly-formed bands started littering the lamposts and construction sites of downtown Toronto. The ...
And the rest is history, part one.
Handbill courtesy Imants Krumins R.I.P. Stooges guitarist Ron Asheton. When Ron’s band Destroy All Monsters played the Horseshoe in ’78 with Suicide and Teenage Head, the bands took turns headlining the three night gig.   After a packed audience rocked to Destroy All Monsters, then Teenage Head — they left, leaving a crowd of about 25 people to experience Suicide.    Singer Alan Vega leaped off the stage and terrified a table to ...
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