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pogo2posterFINAL2The Last Pogo Jumps Again studies the evolution of Toronto from small town to big city and it’s pop/counter-culture lifestyle during the early and mid-70s.  It centers around the first wave of Toronto punk rock and new-wave music, from the Ramones playing the New Yorker Theatre in ’76 through the police shutting down Teenage Head and causing a riot at the Horseshoe Tavern’s infamous “The Last Pogo” concert in December 1978.

London had the Sex Pistols, New York had the Ramones, but Toronto had a punk movement all it’s own.  The Toronto landscape by the late ’70s was forever changed with the infusion of the DIY/Punk/Alternative Culture(s) movement.  Six years in the making, The Last Pogo Jumps Again successfully explores the whys and wherefores of what was arguably one of the most exciting but misunderstood movements in Toronto’s history.

The DVD contains the 204 minute documentary, plus over a 100 minutes of added material, and a snazzy 24-page booklet.  Check the Shop for details on where you can purchase it.

The Last Pogo (1978) is the documentary that chronicled the last punk rock show at the Horseshoe Tavern when it was run by legendary Toronto promoters The Garys (Topp and Cormier) featuring The Scenics, Cardboard Brains, The Secrets, The Mods, The Ugly, The Viletones and Teenage Head. The Last Pogo was released on DVD in 2008 to great reviews.  Available at the Shop.

The Horseshoe Tavern 1978
The Horseshoe 1978. In May, 1978, after they left the New Yorker Theatre, partners Topp, Cormier and Silverman took over management of the Horseshoe Tavern, a dive bar that featured country and western music that was at the down-on-its-luck corner of Spadina and Queen. Opened in the 1940’s by Jack Starr, the Horseshoe had a massive main room that could hold five hundred people, and was a favourite hangout ...
Digital Versatile Disc and Vimeo coming soon.
After starting our project in 2006, and after having a dozen theatrical screenings in Toronto and a couple of festivals, we’re just about ready to release our DVD and get it up on Vimeo for rental and purchase. The DVD will come with a 24 page colour booklet of handbills and photos, and an hour and a half of special features, including extended interviews, unused segments (Tommy ...
Long time, no blog
With The Last Pogo Jumps Again producers/directors Kire Paputts and Colin Brunton busy (Kire developing his feature The Rainbow Kid; Colin producing a TV series), it’s been a long time since we posted anything.   Not that there’s not any news! Gary Topp (of The Garys, the promoters who booked all the cool bands in Toronto during the heyday — and before, and after — of punk/new-wave) was ...
Viliam Hrubovak/Jolie Fejer photos, and thanks for dropping by.
After eight shows in one week at the Big Picture Cinema in Toronto’s east end, our first run has come to a close.  We got a ton of great press, but more gratifying was the reaction we got at the theatre:  applause every night;  no walk-outs;  and people pleasantly surprised that a 3 hr 20 minute movie could move so fast.  As Less Lee Moore of Popshifter said: 
Peter Vronsky’s Crash ‘n’ Burn movie
Screen shot John Catto of The Diodes The Last Pogo Jumps Again has a ton of 16mm film footage from 1977 and 1978.  One of the biggest contributors was filmmaker, author and university professor Peter Vronsky who let us use footage from his Crash ‘n’ Burn movie.  We asked Peter how it came about and what happened to the missing footage. Photo David Andoff “In 1977 I was living ...
Ross Taylor pics
All of the following photos were done by Ross Taylor, and all taken between 1976 and 1980, and they’re all copyright.  First one above is The Dead Boys’ Cheetah Chrome with the Viletones’ Steven Leckie.  Cheetah is the only non-local featured in our feature doc The Last Pogo Jumps Again, because The Dead Boys played in Toronto a lot and Cheetah is awesome.
Dear sweet Joey
For lack of anything interesting to post — yea, we’re almost done, waiting on final approvals on one clip (c’mon John!), a final plea to one significant scenester and singer (c’mon JP!) and a couple of tunes with assurances everything is cool, man! — here’s a lovely piece written by our pal Gary Pig Gold, writer/editor of The Pig Paper (google it) about one of our very favourite ...
Talks Cheap
Hand-drawn handbill by John Pearson; 1973; courtesy Mark Moore We couldn’t make this movie — The Last Pogo Jumps Again: A Biased And Incomplete History Of Toronto Punk Rock Circa September 24 1976 To December 1 1978 — without the generous help of, well, pretty much everyone who was into the scene, a scene that arguably started in the pot-smokey confines of Gary Topp’s subversive Original 99 Cent Roxy ...
The Plane to Hollywood
Freddy Pompeii, 1978;  Photo courtesy Don Pyle. Watch for Don’s photo book coming soon. Last weekend, while some of The Last Pogo Jumps Again crew were busy with Danny Fields (see blog below), another contingent were battling a day of rain on a roadtrip to Phillie to interview original Viletones guitarist Freddy Pompeii. Viletone Chris Haight and his son, LPJA co-director/editor Kire Paputts, guided by the voice of Family Guy’s Stuey on ...
Danny Says
Angel Joey from distasteful ad for company who don’t deserve a credit. Google Danny Fields if you don’t know the name. After leaving Harvard Law School, he fell in with the Warhol crowd in NYC in the mid-sixties and shared an apartment with Edie Sedgwick.  He co-edited 16 Magazine, took lots of acid and was openly gay when it wasn’t fashionable.  He wrote the liner notes to the first live Velvet Underground ...