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pogo2posterFINAL2The Last Pogo Jumps Again studies the evolution of Toronto from small town to big city and it’s pop/counter-culture lifestyle during the early and mid-70s.  It centers around the first wave of Toronto punk rock and new-wave music, from the Ramones playing the New Yorker Theatre in ’76 through the police shutting down Teenage Head and causing a riot at the Horseshoe Tavern’s infamous “The Last Pogo” concert in December 1978.

London had the Sex Pistols, New York had the Ramones, but Toronto had a punk movement all it’s own.  The Toronto landscape by the late ’70s was forever changed with the infusion of the DIY/Punk/Alternative Culture(s) movement.  Six years in the making, The Last Pogo Jumps Again successfully explores the whys and wherefores of what was arguably one of the most exciting but misunderstood movements in Toronto’s history.

The DVD contains the 204 minute documentary, plus over a 100 minutes of added material, and a snazzy 24-page booklet.  Check the Shop for details on where you can purchase it.

The Last Pogo (1978) is the documentary that chronicled the last punk rock show at the Horseshoe Tavern when it was run by legendary Toronto promoters The Garys (Topp and Cormier) featuring The Scenics, Cardboard Brains, The Secrets, The Mods, The Ugly, The Viletones and Teenage Head. The Last Pogo was released on DVD in 2008 to great reviews.  Available at the Shop.

The New Yorker Theatre, Toronto, 1976/1977
The New Yorker in the ’30’s when it was known as The Astor. In 1976, with The Original 99 Cent Roxy still pulling in crowds in the east end, Gary Topp and partner Jeff Silverman opened The New Yorker Theatre, on the Yonge Street Strip, fifty yards south of where the indie underground cinema CineCity once stood. The pinball parlour Funland was across street, and on the next block south ...
Cinema and Punk
The opening shot of the title sequence for our film The Last Pogo Jumps Again is a photo of an empty movie theatre, The Allenby, opened in 1936.  It would become The Original 99 Cent Roxy Theatre (just 243 steps from the Greenwood subway station!) in 1972, run by Gary Topp.   As Stephen Perry of the radio show Equalizing X Distort (on the University of Toronto’s radio ...
Ross Taylor pics
All of the following photos were done by Ross Taylor, and all taken between 1976 and 1980, and they’re all copyright.  First one above is The Dead Boys’ Cheetah Chrome with the Viletones’ Steven Leckie.  Cheetah is the only non-local featured in our feature doc The Last Pogo Jumps Again, because The Dead Boys played in Toronto a lot and Cheetah is awesome.
The Fourth Terrabyte
No, no no — not the 9th Configuration, the 4th Terrabyte. As post-production ramps up at Pogo H.Q., the hard-drive holding 300+ hours of interviews and archival footage started humming a not so happy tune, and so we instantly despatched a beleaguered p.a. to pick up a massive 4 terrabyte external drive for some back-up.  Safety first, beauty last, financial responsibility a distant third. No, no no — ...
Vice. And versa.
When former Viletone Steven Leckie took to the stage at The Last Pogo 30th Anniversary Bash at the Horseshoe Tavern back in 2008, he told the audience (to paraphrase via shoddy memory) that he could “…quote more lines from A Clockwork Orange than things my father told me.” In one of the three interviews we did with Leckie for our soon-to-be-completed project The Last Pogo Jumps Again, ...
No Fun
Courtesy of Aldo Erdic Today The Last Pogo Jumps Again co-director Kire Paputts (with wing-man Richard Fiander handling second camera) hangs out in Grange Park with some of The Diodes, and An Awesome Friend Of The Project tries to get us a few moments with Godfather Iggy Fucking Pop on Friday, ’cause we need to hear his thoughts on all things punk, and find out what specific type of ...
Fast, Cheap & Good
Raggedy handbill, 1976;  courtesy of Robert Malyon. Smoking a joint in the back row of his movie theatre The New Yorker, watching the out-of-synch Blank Generation, promoter Gary Topp twigged on the idea of bringing some of the bands from Amos Poe’s movie into town.  It was 1976.  When he tried to track down The Ramones, few people in the business knew who they were. Photo by David Andoff. A concrete stage was ...
Lux Interior, R.I.P. The way he walked was just the way he walked.
It’s been a rotten few months in the world of old-skool punk.  In October, Teenage Head singer Frankie Venom died from throat cancer;  in January, Stooges’ guitarist Ron Asheton passed away from a heart attack, and today Lux Interior, frontman of ground-breaking psychobilly punk rockers The Cramps died in an L.A. hospital from a pre-exisiting heart problem.  His wife and original guitarist Poison Ivy issued a statement today. We here at ...
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