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pogo2posterFINAL2The Last Pogo Jumps Again studies the evolution of Toronto from small town to big city and it’s pop/counter-culture lifestyle during the early and mid-70s.  It centers around the first wave of Toronto punk rock and new-wave music, from the Ramones playing the New Yorker Theatre in ’76 through the police shutting down Teenage Head and causing a riot at the Horseshoe Tavern’s infamous “The Last Pogo” concert in December 1978.

London had the Sex Pistols, New York had the Ramones, but Toronto had a punk movement all it’s own.  The Toronto landscape by the late ’70s was forever changed with the infusion of the DIY/Punk/Alternative Culture(s) movement.  Six years in the making, The Last Pogo Jumps Again successfully explores the whys and wherefores of what was arguably one of the most exciting but misunderstood movements in Toronto’s history.

The DVD contains the 204 minute documentary, plus over a 100 minutes of added material, and a snazzy 24-page booklet.  Check the Shop for details on where you can purchase it.

The Last Pogo (1978) is the documentary that chronicled the last punk rock show at the Horseshoe Tavern when it was run by legendary Toronto promoters The Garys (Topp and Cormier) featuring The Scenics, Cardboard Brains, The Secrets, The Mods, The Ugly, The Viletones and Teenage Head. The Last Pogo was released on DVD in 2008 to great reviews.  Available at the Shop.

The New Yorker Theatre, Toronto, 1976/1977
The New Yorker in the ’30’s when it was known as The Astor. In 1976, with The Original 99 Cent Roxy still pulling in crowds in the east end, Gary Topp and partner Jeff Silverman opened The New Yorker Theatre, on the Yonge Street Strip, fifty yards south of where the indie underground cinema CineCity once stood. The pinball parlour Funland was across street, and on the next block south ...
Peter Vronsky’s Crash ‘n’ Burn movie
PV still 10 Screen shot John Catto of The Diodes The Last Pogo Jumps Again has a ton of 16mm film footage from 1977 and 1978.  One of the biggest contributors was filmmaker, author and university professor Peter Vronsky who let us use footage from his Crash ‘n’ Burn movie.  We asked Peter how it came about and what happened to the missing footage. Photo David Andoff “In 1977 I was living ...
Gail Bryck photos
Fashion When Gail Bryck took photos, she’d use a long exposure.  This is a shot of The Viletones’ Steven Leckie showing off his scars — and an unfortunate glimpse of a swastika patch on guitarist Freddy Pompeii. Zero4’s Zero with innkeeper of the 404 speak-easy, Gambi Bowker.  It’s as shocking now — if not more so than it was — to see how blithely people sported swastikas.  This ...
Shit Bandit Talking Heads and The Dishes
pogodishes “The art scene and the punk scene were completely intertwined,” says Erika Larner.  A regular at the Toronto’s infamous Crash ‘n’ Burn club in ’77, she now works on TV series and feature films in the wardrobe department. The Shit Bandit was a performance group who played at C.E.A.C., The Centre for Experimental Art and Communication in 1976. In the summer of 1977, CEAC lent their ...
Toronto punk handbills 1976 – 1978
HORSETROGGS There are over 600 photographs in The Last Pogo Jumps Again, and a ton more handbills. This is the handbill for a 1977 show at the New Yorker.  You can tell that it was done with Letraset, because the lines aren’t perfect, but it was hard to figure out how they actually superimposed the photo of the cops onto the photo of the Ramones.  No Photoshop back then, ...
Shave the baby
There’s a whole pile of vets blowing through town in the next month, and it’s back to school time.   So grab your notebooks and some fake i.d. and get ready to watch some punk pioneers throw it down.  Sit down, shut up and learn.  Or stay home and shave the baby. Cheetah Chrome, ex-Dead Boy and Rocket from the Tombs, will be playing with Toronto’s premiere punk cover band (originals ...
Our Back Pages
Steve Koch with The Ugly at The Last Pogo 30th;  photo Ross Taylor. In the late seventies, being the only punk in Calgary (although he’d find out later there was this other guy called Warren Kinsella skulking around the south side) made Steve Koch feel as though people thought he was either (a) dangerous, (b) developmentally challenged, or, most likely (c) a little bit of both. He sent a fan letter to ...
Dada’s Boys
Photo courtesy Gary Topp Pogo H.Q. was thrilled and very grateful to get a copy of Dada’s Boys, the short filmmaker Peter Vronsky shot in ’77.   A shit-load of great footage by Vronsky and friends was lost by the CBC in thier inimitable style  — The Viletones‘ first trip to NYC; performances by The Ramones and Dead Boys — but the 30 minutes of footage existing is great:  interviews with ...
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